Program


Program

2018 Biomedical HIV Prevention Summit

Tentative Workshop Agenda (titles are subject to change)

Session 1 | Session 2 | Session 3 | Session 4

Monday, December 3

Session 1 Workshops: 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Biomedical Intervention Programs for Veterans and the Military

Track: Federal
Location: Diamond 7, 4th Level
Presenters:
Ekow Sey, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health
Maggie Chartier, Veterans Affairs

What do biomedical interventions look like for the military and veterans community? With the VA being one of the largest providers of HIV care what lessons can we learn from the work of the VA and how do we better understand how to service the overlapping military community? DoD and VA each have large, important systems that can offer unique findings and understandings of how to approach certain questions.

Potential Biomedical Prevention Options for the Future

Track: Other
Location: Diamond 8, 4th Level
Presenters:
Claire Collins, Micobicide Trials Network
Stephaun Wallace, HIV Vaccine Trials Network

As we think about what ’s there now, it’s also good to keep an eye on the future. What are other prevention strategies in development and how might they shape the field? This session will be focused on the work of two HIV research networks that will share updates in the two fronts: vaccines, and microbicides. With dozens of trials going, or on their way into the field, the question becomes what can we foresee and what should we expect from these potential prevention options?

Housing, Healthcare and the Biomedical World

Track: Evaluation
Location: Diamond 6, 4th Level
Presenters:
Lee Storrow, North Carolina AIDS Action Network
Ernest Hopkins, San Francisco AIDS Foundation

Social determinants of health should be central to mainstream discussions and funding decisions about healthcare. As we look to biomedical interventions how to do we blend in and address other structural drivers that effect health. How are providers learning to meet the larger needs of clients and what models exist for thinking about the power of prevention through a housing first lends. This session will look at the ways to integrate supportive housing as a key piece of the HIV prevention continuum.

How can injectable treatments be effective in our communities?

Track: Gay and Bi Men
Location: Diamond 9, 4th Level
Presenters:
Sheldon Fields, New York Institute of Technology
Raphael Landovitz, UCLA
Alex Rinehart, ViiV

What can we be looking forward to in new delivery options for PrEP and treatment. Initial patient data on treatment and injectables came out this summer. And HPTN 083 is collecting data and should give us results in 2021. We have initial data from HPTN 77 that can give us insights into injectables. Yet a new delivery mechanism brings its own set of challenges. However, the question remains, “Are we ready to give injectables a shot?

Partnerships with Existing Curanderos (Healers)

Track: Immigration
Location: Diamond 10, 4th Level
Presenters:
Oscar Lopez, Valley AIDS Council
Carolyn Kuali’I, HIV Advocate

Cultural practices can play a critical role in health and health-seeking behaviors for people of color. This session is a chance to have a robust conversation about the role of blending cultural practices and biomedical science. This session will examine this unique relationship drawing on lessons from a variety of backgrounds meant to meet the holistic needs of members of the community.

PrEP and transwomen

Track: Trans Experience
Location: Platinum F, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Chandi Moore, CHLA
Jonathon Anderson, Gilead Sciences
Kymberly Gordon, Damien Ministries
Cathy Reback, UCLA

A community dialogue to represent the announcement out of IAC about the interaction between PrEP and feminizing hormones. IAC pointed to the concern about feminizing hormone treatments appear to lower the body’s level of one of the drugs in Truvada when the combination antiretroviral tablet is used as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV among transgender women. Across the country, there is still misinformation and mistrust of the trans community and PrEP. This panel will have a dialogue about community engagement with the trans community. How can organizations be better about getting the message out? How do we overcome mistrust and share useful information? Panelist will try to offer key insights on the topic.

PrEP programs for women

Track: Women
Location: Platinum G, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Jessica Sales, Emory University
Danielle Campbell US PrEP Women’s Working Group
Shannon Weber, HIVE

Six years in and the numbers haven’t changed significantly as expected moved in a large direction. What is missing in the context of PrEP and women? A critical intersectional discussion about what is happening in the prevention landscape and why are there gaps for women. What programs have found success and are there other opportunities that we are not tapping into yet? Can we borrow strategies from other successful women’s health programs?

PrEP, PEP, and Immigrants: Identifying Barriers and Navigating Assistance Programs

Track: Immigration
Location: Platinum H, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Kenyatta Parker, Christie’s Place
Moctezuma Garcia, Texas State University

Many barriers exist in the creation and development of systems that address the multifaceted needs of immigrant and migrant communities. This session will focus on various strategies that have had some impact on making a difference in these communities. Also, the panel will address challenges in the field, gaps in the work, and opportunities for expansion or partnerships.

Religious Leaders and Their Role in Biomedical Intervention

Track: Other
Location: Platinum I, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Rev. Edwin Sanders
Dr. Joyce Turner Keller
Richard Zaldivar, The Wall Las Memorias Project

Spirituality can play an important for many people and can be extremely important to people living with HIV (PLWH). Health professionals across the different fields—medicine, nursing, social work, and public health—have already identified the need for, but often struggled finding, appropriate spiritual and faith-based HIV interventions. The nature of spiritual-faith-based interventions remains unclear, partly because they are not universally accepted or supported, and partly because the relationship between spirituality/religion and HIV-related outcomes is not well understood. This discussion will speak with community members and faith leaders about the role of spirituality in the biomedical intervention space.

Sexual Health Rights for Youth

Track: Youth
Location: Platinum J, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Ayako Miyashita, UCLA
Percy Randy, LA Gay and Lesbian Center
Joaquin Gutierrez, LA Connect to Protect Coalition

For many young people, access to information about their sexual health and rights remains a mystery. Even more so, how to access preventive health services on their own without their parents. This session will focus on the intersection of rights, sexual health, and young people. It will include a discussion of key issues in the field that can influence young people’s access to and retention in healthcare such as minor consent laws, explanation of benefits, access to insurance, and more.

Evaluating HIV and PrEP Navigation Services: A Novel Demonstration

Track: Evaluation
Location: Diamond Ballroom 2, 4th Level
Presenters:
Robin Kelley, PhD, NMAC Evaluation Manager
Eric Abdullateef, MBA, Former President of the Washington, DC Evaluators

This interactive workshop has at its goal to examine the value and effectiveness of evaluations and the benefit and timeliness of their use with HIV and PrEP navigation service programs. Also discussed will be the role that navigators can play in relieving health disparities, resolving barriers, and through, evaluation, measuring program satisfaction. The use of multimedia will help to guide the interactivity of the workshop.  Presenters will help the participants to work through the CDC’s Prevention with Positives (PwP) in Action Novel, found online at https://effectiveinterventions.cdc.gov/PwP/story.html. Presenters will show video excerpts to raise awareness and educate participants currently grappling with monitoring and evaluating in one or more facets of navigation service or contemplating an HIV or PrEP navigation program launch. Focus will be on evaluation resources and the consistent monitoring and evaluation of quality-of-care indicators to further develop the programming and to direct resource allocation. There will also be real time polling and discussions on polled topics.

Advancing Racial Justice in the HIV Response: Unlearning Racism 101

Track: Other
Location: Diamond Ballroom 1, 4th Level
Presenters:
Venita Ray, Positive Women’s Network
Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network

This introductory workshop is designed to support HIV advocates in utilizing a racial justice lens in their work. Through discussion, activities, and training, we will deepen our collective understanding of what racial justice means and what it looks like when we achieve racial justice. Participants will learn basic concepts, including different ways that racism manifests through interpersonal interactions and structures in our society. Finally, we will consider ways that policy and practice in the HIV arena can uphold or dismantle racial inequity.

Session 2 Workshops: 2:45 – 4:15 pm

Centering the Work with Sex Workers: PrEP, PEP, and U=U

Track: Other
Location: Diamond 6, 4th Level
Presenters:
Magali Lerman, Reframe Justice and Health
Toni Newman, Author “I Rise – the Transformation”

Sex workers have begun to speak out about PrEP’s utility and educating their communities about its benefits and challenges. PrEP has the potential to be one of the best tools brought to market for receptive (bottoms) partner protection.

Gender Affirming Care to Improve PrEP Access and Use among Transgender Women and Men

Track: Trans Experience
Location: Diamond 7, 4th Level
Presenters:
Lee Dyer, University of Richmond

Many transgender women and men lack access to culturally competent and gender-affirming healthcare. Greater provision of gender affirming care could improve healthcare engagement among transgender women and men, and thereby improve PrEP use among these important groups. This presentation panel will discuss synergies and models for the concurrent provision of gender-affirming care and PrEP care to transgender men and women

How are We Doing? The Status of Biomedical Interventions: Solutions from the Field

Track: Evaluation
Location: Diamond 8, 4th Level
Presenters:
Susan Alvarado, AIDS Project Los Angeles
Miguel Diaz Martinez, Crescent Care
Bryan Fallios, Lifelong AIDS

As we scale up biomedical interventions, are we prepared to make sure these programs meet their targets? It has become clear that we need new methods of capturing and recording the effectiveness of the work being done in this new era. As new models of service delivery and innovative strategies are rolled out to reach those that have been historically not engaged in public health, so too, must our evaluation approaches. It is imperative that we have to measure tools to assess the impact of our efforts as we seek to engage and retain our target audience in prevention methods.

Improving Access for Those in Need: Drug Use and Biomedical Prevention

Track: Other
Location: Diamond 9, 4th Level
Presenters:
Ricky Bluthenthal, Keck School of Medicine, USC
Patrick Rezac, One Voice Recovery, Inc.

People who inject drugs (PWID) are a key population that is being left behind in the US’s scope of HIV prevention programs. In the height of an opioid epidemic, what does it mean to provide a prevention package to those injecting drugs? This session will focus on a conversation about the role of biomedical prevention in drug-user health programs, and vice versa.

Intermittent PrEP: Is it for More than Just the French

Track: Gay and Bi Men
Location: Diamond 10, 4th Level
Presenters:
Joshua O’Neal, San Francisco AIDS Foundation
Robert Grant, San Francisco AIDS Foundation
Shannon Weber, HIVE

Can event-based dosing PrEP become a strategy for people living in the US? The French/Canadian Ipergay trial reported effectiveness for intermittent PrEP of 86%. The Ipergay protocol was this: Take TWO Truvada pills from 24 hours to 2 hours in advance of anticipated exposure to HIV. If you do have sex that risks exposure, then take another pill 2-24 hours after sex and another one the day after that (i.e., 26-50 hours after the last sex). What does PrEP in the wild look like for people in the US? As PrEP builds more steam, does this nonstandard protocol fit in the prevention package? How do we respond to individuals that want a different dosing strategy? What does it mean not to take PrEP daily?

PEP and Women: What are the Options

Track: Women
Location: Platinum G, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Oni Blackstock, NYC Department of Health

In the world of PrEP and U=U are women hearing conversations about PEP? Are these important intervention options being heard by women or have they been lost in the shuttle? If biomedical prevention promises are to reach their true potential, there must be a full display of options, and we must give people the opportunity to choose what they need at their movement in time for their prevention choices. This session will focus on “Where does PEP make it into our discussion”?

Social Determinants of Health in Immigrant Communities

Track: Immigration
Location: Platinum H, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Laura Costillo, Bienestar Human Services
Bamby Salcedo, Trans Latin@ Coalition

Migration between countries is at higher levels than ever before. It is increasingly recognized that health and social policies within and between countries can influence the health of immigrants, their families, and population health patterns. Understanding the influence of immigration on health and health-seeking behavior is critical to making certain that there is access to and uptake of biomedical strategies. This session will explore how to address policies that create limitations to health access among immigrants.

Social Media Strategies for Outreach engagement and retention

Track: Youth
Location: Platinum I, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Michelle Kipke, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles

With the web 2.0 generation taking charge, the use of social media has become a powerful staple for. Sharing information between groups and communities. Instantaneously, any message has the power to go viral, reaching a massive amount of people. This enables reaching people that would otherwise not traditionally engage in public health efforts. Making messages go viral can reach those that have not been engaged traditionally in public health. This session will focus on strategies and efforts that can bring the prevention message to the larger untapped community. How do we break through all of the other traffic in order to access the people that need to hear updated messages about HIV?

Transgender Equity, Healthcare Rights and HIV treatment

Track: Trans Experience
Location: Platinum J, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Sophia Kass, Positively Trans
Maria Roman, APAIT

60% of trans people lack employer-based health insurance, 50% have to educate their providers, 19% have been denied healthcare – or worse. These statistics add up to a crisis in access to healthcare for the 1.6 million Americans who identify as transgender. But what do we mean when we say “access?” Transgender stigma and discrimination experienced in healthcare can influence transgender people’s healthcare access and utilization. Thus, understanding how stigma and discrimination manifest and function in healthcare encounters is critical to addressing health disparities for transgender people. What are best practices for creating a gender-affirming environment that can improve access to and retention in biomedical strategies for people of trans experiences?

Who to Test and Where to Refer? Looking at the Outreach and Linkage Strategies for Biomedical Interventions

Track: Evaluation
Location: Platinum F, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Ronellis Tunstill, The Brothers United Network
Aaron Siegler, Emory University

As models for prevention become more steeped in biomedical care, how we track that response and needs of the community? What new models exist for early intervention around retention and care with the most vulnerable? And how do we respond to what we learn from evaluation to create meaningful impact? How can we assess and track each piece that is critical to making a difference along both the prevention and the treatment continue? And how do we make sure that this happens in real time?

Trans Justice is Gender Justice: Here’s Why

Track: Other
Location: Diamond 2, 4th Level
Presenters:
Waheedah Shabazz-El, Positive Women’s Network
Kelly Flannery, Positive Women’s Network
Keiva Lei Cadena

This workshop will challenge participants to reconsider what we’ve been taught about gender and sexuality. Participants will consider social and political gender constructs, learn about how people of cis and trans experience can be differently impacted by these constructs, and learn to apply gender justice as a framework. We will conclude by hearing participants’ visions to ground HIV advocacy in a deeper analysis of gender and power.

Session 3 Workshops: 4:30 – 6:00 pm

Access to Biomedical Prevention for Women in the South

Track: Women
Location: Diamond 7, 4th Level
Presenters:
Erika Sugimori, Louisiana Health Department
Anar Patel, George Washington University

As biomedical interventions access expands, we are still missing a vital element in reaching those in need of another option. Women in the South have not been able to find their place in this new option. This presentation will explore how different kinds of data are used to target HIV prevention interventions in women and give examples of how readily available public data can be used for the purpose of supporting efforts such as data to care.

Use of Automated Natural Language Text-Based Support for PrEP Adherence

Track: Other
Location: Diamond 8, 4th Level
Presenters:
Jonathan Fuchs, San Francisco Department of Public Health
Cathy Reback, UCLA

Automated telecommunication interventions, including short message service and interactive voice response, are increasingly being used to promote adherence to medications. The session will focus on a variety of text-based strategies and how to optimize them for specific populations

Federal Strategies for Biomedical Interventions

Track: Federal
Location: Diamond 9, 4th Level
Presenters:
Antigone Dempsey, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Nathan Fecik, Department of Health and Human Services
Dawn Smith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Given the shifting policy climate around PrEP since its 2012, FDA approval and the new focus on the inclusion of viral suppression message, this session will be chance to hear from key stakeholders the exact nature of the federal government’s response to these topics. This session will provide an opportunity to sit down with members of the federal partner’s a to answer questions regarding the government’s plans for biomedical interventions? What are the Goals for PrEP and the future of U=U?? Presentations from representatives from key federal agencies and offices including HRSA, CDC, OHAIDP, SAMSHA, among others will open a group discussion on the key federal strategies.

Biomedical Services for the Previously Incarcerated Returning to the Community

Track: Other
Location: Diamond 10, 4th Level
Presenters:
Sonali Kulkarni, Los Angeles County Department of Health
Nina Harawa, UCLA

Incarceration is a crisis among African-Americans, and the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in incarcerated men and women is three to five times that of the general population. These factors contribute to numerous racial/ethnic health disparities, including HIV/AIDS. These factors call for an understanding on the part of service providers who are working with returned citizens in order to optimize care for prevention and treatment in this biomedical era.

PrEP-ception: PrEP and Reproductive Health

Track: Women
Location: Platinum H, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Yamini Oseguera-Bhatnager, HIVE
Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network
Lashonda Spencer, USC
Alice Stek, USC

Research shows a strong desire to have a child among HIV serodiscordant heterosexual couples (where one is HIV-positive, and the other is not). But what does is encompassed to have a discussion of reproductive justice in an HIV context? One of the many uses for PrEP is to make reproduction possible for those in serodiscordant couples. This session will explore not just PrEP-ception but also what does reproductive justice mean for the HIV community.

The Lesson from HPTN 073 Uptake and Access in Black Gay and Bisexual Men

Track: Gay and Bi Men
Location: Platinum I, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Wilbert Jordan, Charles Drew University
DaShawn Usher, Mobilizing Our Brothers Initiative
Sheldon Fields, New York Institute of Technology

Drawing on qualitative data, quantitative data, and popular culture, this talk will explore community awareness of and attitudes toward biomedical prevention strategies such as PrEP, PEP, and Treatment as Prevention. What lesson can be drawn from HPTN 073? The conversation will also shed light on emerging threats to, and opportunities for universal uptake of these powerful prevention tools, especially among the communities hit the hardest by the HIV/ AIDS epidemic

The Importance of PrEP Workgroups to Ensure Success

Track: Evaluation
Location: Platinum J, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Gary Daffin, Multicultural AIDS Coalition
Craig Pulsipher, AIDS Project Los Angeles
Sable Nelson, NMAC
Raul Quintero, JWHC Institute

One of the driving forces behind PrEP work in some jurisdictions has been the establishment of PrEP Working groups. Committed collectives of individuals from multiple agencies that have worked to push PrEP priorities and systematize PrEP work across the jurisdiction. This will be a chance to hear from NMAC’s project of working with distinctions in their PrEP workgroups. Also, other PrEP workgroups will present about their findings and their continued work.

Youth and TASP, PrEP and PEP, the Importance of a Sexual History

Track: Youth
Location: Diamond 6, 4th Level
Presenters:
Helen Burnside, Denver Training Center
Sabrina Cluesman, JASMYN

Given the primary prevention needs of young people, discussing what is happening is critical to understanding this population. This session will be a roundtable with youth-serving organizations that will examine practices and strategies that are proving effective/working in the field of biomedical prevention. Also, they will discuss transitioning youth out of a youth-specific program youth-serving program as they age out of that population.

Developing PrEP Campaigns for Black Women and Latinas: Local and National Perspectives

Track: Women
Location: Diamond 2, 4th Level
Presenters:
Raniyah Copeland, MPH, Black AIDS Institute
Leo Moore, MD, MSHPM, LA County Department of Public Health

Ending the HIV epidemic in Black and Latino communities, and ultimately the United States,
will take multi-faceted, innovative, and intentional approaches. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that 1 in 5 new HIV diagnoses in 2016 were in women, women accounted for less than 5% of PrEP users in the same year. CDC also reported that Black men and women are nearly 6 times more likely to access PrEP, although they account for 40% of people for whom PrEP is indicated.

Black AIDS Institute and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health have done extensive work to increase the utilization of biomedical interventions in communities of color. After years of formative research, including surveying women at the ESSENCE festival, and speaking with women and community stakeholders on their national PrEP tour, BAI released the “Black Women and PrEP Toolkit”

in 2018. After conducting community-led focus groups and conversations with key stakeholders, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health released the “Sister Friends: Get PrEP’d” campaign to increase awareness of PrEP in Black and Latina cisgender and transgender women in 2018. During this session we will discuss the development of these campaigns from local and national perspectives, impact on PrEP utilization, and how increasing utilization of biomedical interventions will require communities, community-based organizations, and health departments to develop tools and initiatives that speak to the intersectionality of women’s lives.

Tuesday, December 4

Session 4 Workshops: 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Adapting HIV Behavioral Interventions to Support PrEP Initiation and Adherence

Track: Other
Location: Platinum I, 3rd Level
Presenters:
George Greene, Northwestern University
Carlos Rodriguez-Diaz, George Washington University

For a long time, there has been an intentional separation of prevention and care/treatment work. However, in a world where the prominence and necessity of biomedical prevention and care increases, a natural synergy and need to leverage transferable skills now exists. This session will discuss: (1) lessons learned from providers of biomedical prevention and care; (2) how an integrated approach to biomedical prevention and care benefits clients and the greater community; (3) how to build upon skills that are useful for both biomedical prevention and care work; (4) how to bridge the prevention and treatment divide; (5) how CBOs can transform to meet the needs of a medicalized model; and (6) how to develop a seamless system of care and prevention reflective of a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach.

Community Partnerships to Ensure Holistic Care

Track: Trans Experience
Location: Diamond 7, 4th Level
Presenters:
Sean Coleman, Destination Tomorrow
Sid Jordan, UCLA

When we say that there needs to be inclusive spaces for everyone, we have to make sure that we are meeting that challenge. How do we adapt and transform our systems and practices to be inclusive of transmen? How do we create and implement systems that can be responsive to their needs and their place in the movement?

Engagement and Empowering Service Providers to Meet Women in Non-Traditional Social Settings

Track: Women
Location: Diamond 8, 4th Level
Presenters:
Lisa Diane White, SisterLove
Traci Bivens-Davis, AIDS Project Los Angeles
Susan Alvarado, AIDS Project Los Angeles

Biomedical strategies will never meet their promise without getting into the lives of the people that need them. In both viral suppression and PrEP use, there is a gender disparity that needs to be addressed with new strategies. What does it mean to create programs that seek to engage and empower through effective conversations about the use of new biomedical strategies? And how can these conversations take place in non-traditional settings?

Leveraging the 340B Program and State Program Funding in a Non-Expansion State

Track: Other
Location: Diamond 9, 4th Level
Presenters:
Mary Elizabeth Marr, Thrive Alabama
Eric Mayes, Virginia Department of Health
Susana Keeshun, University of Utah

PrEP is an important tool part of the prevention toolkit. Finding funding for programs in non-Medicaid expansion states can be a challenge. This session will focus on how to leverage the 340B program to help fill the needs gap in non-expansion states and sharing stories and challenges in setting up these programs within the settings.

Monitoring Health Plan Policies, Costs, and Barriers to Pay for PrEP for Uninsured Patients in the Non-Expansion States

Track: Evaluation
Location: Diamond 10, 4th Level
Presenters:
Edwin Corbin-Gutierrez, NASTAD
Dori Molozanov, NASTAD

A PrEP client is facing a cost-spike after the co-pay card ran out? Out-of-options? This workshop will provide a “how to” guide to conduct a PrEP-specific insurance assessment (no insurance expertise is needed, and math skills are not required). The workshop will focus on challenges facing underinsured PrEP clients and discuss creative tactics to overcome cost-related barriers. Presenters will also provide updates on insurance policies impacting PrEP access, including restrictions on how co-pay cards count toward a PrEP client’s insurance contributions, and share strategies to stay updated on these policies to protect clients.

STIs and Sexual Health

Track: Gay and Bi Men
Location: Platinum F, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Arleen Leibowitz, UCLA
Matthew Golden, University of Washington
David Harvey, National Coalition of STD Directors

A small booklet called “How to Have Sex in an Epidemic” appeared in May 1983. It was written by two HIV-positive patient collaborators. As we make strides in the prevention and treatment landscape, it is time to talk about sex in another epidemic, the STI epidemic. This session will focus on how to shift strategies for combating these epidemics and how to bring about change given the new conditions. What does it mean to work in the era of condom decline, in which there are new condomless protections for HIV and record high levels of reportable STIs? What new strategies need to be embraced to tackle the epidemic?

The Problem of PrEP Persistence

Track: Gay and Bi Men
Location: Platinum G, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Anthony Mills, Men’s Health Foundation
Pedro Serrano, Hektoen Institute
Daniel Mendez, Howard Brown Health

This presentation will explore emerging research and evaluation data that indicate challenges and disparities in PrEP retention and persistence. The panel will identify factors that may be driving poor PrEP care retention, persistence and consider the implications for programs that aim to sustain and re-engage consumers in PrEP care. Novel strategies for promoting PrEP care adherence and persistence will be described. The audience will have the opportunity to brainstorm their ideas as well.

Addressing mistrust in vulnerable populations so that they engage successfully in public health agencies and endeavors

Track: Evaluation
Location: Platinum F, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Gina Bonilla, Hunter College

How do we model, address and overcome mistrust within vulnerable communities of public health agencies and endeavors? It is often the elephant in the room when it comes to engaging communities of color. Rarely do we take a hard look at ways to change the paradigm and measure how effective we are at earning the trust of the communities that we serve.

Women of Color & Community Mobilization

Track: Women
Location: Platinum J, 3rd Level
Presenters:
Tiffany Marrero
Ebony Gordon, Nashville Cares
Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network
Jada Cardona, Transitions Louisiana

The Community Mobilization (CM) model calls for the engagement of communities in dialogue and strategic action around shared concerns. This model has been used to promote safer sex and reduce gender-based violence among at-risk individuals. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), should be considered a woman-initiated approach to HIV prevention because it provides the opportunity for discreet use and does not require the consent or knowledge of a male partner. Despite these advantages, PrEP access, uptake, and adherence among cisgender and transgender women have been suboptimal to date. Various gender-based barriers such as intimate partner violence (IPV), reproductive coercion, and financial insecurity can impede the effectiveness of PrEP among women. This workshop will address the components of the CM model as they relate to PrEP uptake among at-risk women.

The Kids Aren't Alright: A Conversation with Youth Leaders about HIV in the Age of Millennials

Track: Youth
Location: Diamond 6, 4th Level
Presenters:
Tapakorn Prasertsith, Youth Advocate
Ariel Sabillon , Youth Advocate
Terrance Walker, Youth Advocate
Marnina Ross-Miller, Youth Advocate

A session run completely by and featuring only youth across the nation from NMAC’s Youth Initiative Scholarship. We offer an honest look at the climate surrounding HIV from these youth leaders. They will share their individual experiences in their respective communities and what youth-serving/youth-inclusive organizations can learn and implement to better serve and reach more youth. “Millennials” have undeservedly gained a bad reputation, and we want to dispel any myths and misconceptions about why communities (namely, younger communities of color) are perceived as “hard-to-reach”, “uneducated”, or “reckless” and get into the real root causes of the rise in new HIV diagnoses in youth, as observed by youth that are walking that fine line between serving our communities while being very much a part of them.

We all have a Role: Connecting CBO and Healthcare teams to Increase PrEP Access

Track: Other
Location: Diamond Ballroom 2, 4th Level
Presenter: JaDawn Wright, Pacific AIDs Education & Training Center

NMAC and the Pacific AETC present this interactive session in collaboration. The session will provide examples and best practices for partnership between healthcare teams (including clinicians) and CBO teams (including Navigators, HIV Testing and Linkage counselors, and PrEP Program Managers) to increase PrEP access. Each team has expertise to share with each other and the silos between these caring professions are a barrier to patient access, exemplified in PrEP Access. Some of the most common places for collaborations include easing medical provider anxiety around sexual history taking and PrEP eligibility, assisting providers in managing insurance issues related to PrEP, and supporting patients in medication adherence. Presenters will share the results of a PrEP Academic Detailing pilot project, findings from provider focus groups on PrEP, and tools that CBOs can use to engage providers to increase PrEP access.